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Proceedings Paper

Q-switched Nd:YAG laser engraving
Author(s): Hong Gao; Gengxing Luo; Ke Yu; Guang-Nan Chen
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Paper Abstract

IN this paper, the engraving process with Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser is investigated. High power density is the pre- requisition to vapor materials, and high repetition rate makes the engraving process highly efficient. An acousto- optic Q-Switch is applied in the cavity of CW 200 W Nd:YAG laser to achieve the high peak power density and the high pulse repetition rate. Different shape craters are formed in a patterned structure on the material surface when the laser beam irradiates on it by controlling power density, pulse repetition rate, pulse quantity and pulse interval. In addition, assisting oxygen gas is used for not only improving combustion to deepen the craters but also removing the plasma that generated on the top of craters. Off-focus length classified as negative and positive has a substantial effect on crater diameters. According to the message of rotating angle positions from material to be engraved and the information of graph pixels from computer, a special graph is imparted to the material by integrating the Q- Switched Nd:YAG laser with the computer graph manipulation and the numerically controlled worktable. The crater diameter depends on laser beam divergence and laser focal length. The crater diameter changes from 50 micrometers to 300 micrometers , and the maximum of crater depth reaches one millimeter.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 April 1998
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 3272, Laser Techniques for Surface Science III, (30 April 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.307143
Show Author Affiliations
Hong Gao, Institute of Mechanics (China)
Gengxing Luo, Institute of Mechanics (China)
Ke Yu, Institute of Mechanics (China)
Guang-Nan Chen, Institute of Mechanics (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3272:
Laser Techniques for Surface Science III
Hai-Lung Dai; Hans-Joachim Freund, Editor(s)

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