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Proceedings Paper

Quantitative and qualitative histopathological comparisons of multielectrode balloon and thermal balloon endometrial ablation
Author(s): Sharon L. Thomsen; Thomas P. Ryan; Karen Kuk-Nagle; Cindi Soto; Thierry G. Vancaillie; Jose Garza-Leal
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Paper Abstract

Quantitative and qualitative histopathologic techniques were used to compare the distribution, severity and depths of acute thermal lesions formed by in vivo placement of three different intracavitary thermal balloon instruments in the uteri of 19 women scheduled for hysterectomy. Thermal damage reflected by (1) Nitro Blue Tetrazolium stains separating `living' from `dead' tissues, (2) red zone formation and the (3) presence of a clear zone observed in histologic slides extended into the myometrium. One hysterectomy specimen removed 4 days after treatment showed superficial slough of the endometrium but solid, coagulation necrosis of the deeper endometrium and adjacent myometrium. The treatment effect and success of intracavitary thermal coagulation may be related to a delicate balance of complete irradiation of endometrium versus fibrous stricture and intracavitary adhesions of the uterus.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 April 1998
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 3249, Surgical Applications of Energy, (2 April 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.304335
Show Author Affiliations
Sharon L. Thomsen, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Thomas P. Ryan, Valleylab Inc. (United States)
Karen Kuk-Nagle, Valleylab Inc. (United States)
Cindi Soto, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Thierry G. Vancaillie, Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. (United States)
Jose Garza-Leal, Univ. Hospital/Monterrey (Mexico)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3249:
Surgical Applications of Energy
Thomas P. Ryan, Editor(s)

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