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Proceedings Paper

Watershed-based image segmentation: an effective tool for detecting landscape structure
Author(s): Milos Sramek; Thomas Wrbka
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Paper Abstract

Satellite image segmentation with the aim to detect spatial units having an ecological meaning has become an important field in methodological research in modern landscape ecology. Within the theoretical framework, elaborated in, a landscape can be defined as spatial arrangement of ecosystems. Regions, that are more or less homogeneous in that sense, become more and more important as land units for physical-planning purposes. Such spatial objects can of course differ in size, in Central Europe they usually can be eliminated at the scale of some square kilometers. Therefore such objects should be detectable on satellite images and can then be ecologically characterized by their most important features: structure, function and change. Elaborating operational procedures to do that for the Austrian territory is the aim of a multidisciplinary research project called SINUS (structural features of landscapes as indicators for sustainable land use), which is financed by the Austrian Ministry for Science and Transportation and will be finished in 1999. This article can be regarded as one methodological output of this project.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 February 1998
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 3346, Sixth International Workshop on Digital Image Processing and Computer Graphics: Applications in Humanities and Natural Sciences, (1 February 1998); doi: 10.1117/12.301372
Show Author Affiliations
Milos Sramek, Institute of Measurement Science (Austria)
Thomas Wrbka, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3346:
Sixth International Workshop on Digital Image Processing and Computer Graphics: Applications in Humanities and Natural Sciences
Emanuel Wenger; Leonid I. Dimitrov, Editor(s)

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