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Proceedings Paper

Immunohistochemical observations on tumor suppressor gene p53 status in mouse fibrosarcoma following in-vivo photodynamic therapy: the role of xanthine oxidase activity
Author(s): Piotr P. Ziolkowski; Krzysztof Symonowicz; Artur Milnerowicz; Beata J. Osiecka
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Paper Abstract

Tumor suppressor gene p53 expression in a mouse fibrosarcoma following in-vivo photodynamic therapy has been studied using the immunohistochemical method. Photodynamic treatment involved injections of the well known sensitizer -- hematoporphyrin derivative at the doses 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg of body weight and irradiations at the doses 25 and 50 J/sq cm. Glass slide preparations from PDT-treated tumors were obtained at different time points (15, 60 minutes, 2 and 24 hours) after therapy, subsequently stained for wild type/mutant p53, and assessed for positive reaction. High PDT doses (HpD -- 2.5 mg/kg; light dose -- 50 J/sq cm) correlated with decreased expression of p53 in tumor cells. The other part of the study was directed to measure the xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in the tumor cells. PDT included injections of HpD and light exposure at the same doses as for p53 study. We observed a complete inhibition of the enzyme activity. The slight increase in XO activity was found following treatment with either light or HpD alone.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 December 1997
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 3191, Photochemotherapy: Photodynamic Therapy and Other Modalities III, (29 December 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.297813
Show Author Affiliations
Piotr P. Ziolkowski, Medical Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland)
Krzysztof Symonowicz, Medical Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland)
Artur Milnerowicz, Medical Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland)
Beata J. Osiecka, Medical Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3191:
Photochemotherapy: Photodynamic Therapy and Other Modalities III
Kristian Berg; Benjamin Ehrenberg; Zvi Malik; Johan Moan; Abraham Katzir, Editor(s)

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