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Proceedings Paper

Effects of geometric uncertainty on the inverse EEG problem
Author(s): David M. Weinstein; Christopher R. Johnson
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Paper Abstract

A standard method for noninvasively computing neurocortical potentials from potentials measured on the scalp surface is to solve the problem on a generalized geometry and map the results back to the true model. This solution to the inverse EEG problem has been employed using spherical and, more recently, generic cranial models as templates. In the case of the most complex spherical models, the patient's skin, bone, cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter and white matter surfaces are mapped onto concentric spheres. The simplicity of the spherical domain allows for an analytic solution to the surface mapping inverse problem; however, the inaccuracy of such a solution challenges its clinical value. Similarly, solving the problem on a predefined generic model also holds computational allure--the generic model can be hand-picked to reduce the ill-conditioning of the problem. However, we suggest that such results from generic models are still not sufficiently accurate to be of general clinical use. In our paper, we evaluate the impact of varying both model accuracy and model complexity on the inverse cortical mapping. Small modeling perturbations (as might be introduced from noisy or under-sampled data) are shown to have large and detrimental effects on the quality of the solution.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 December 1997
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 3171, Computational, Experimental, and Numerical Methods for Solving Ill-Posed Inverse Imaging Problems: Medical and Nonmedical Applications, (9 December 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.294240
Show Author Affiliations
David M. Weinstein, Univ. of Utah (United States)
Christopher R. Johnson, Univ. of Utah (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3171:
Computational, Experimental, and Numerical Methods for Solving Ill-Posed Inverse Imaging Problems: Medical and Nonmedical Applications
Randall Locke Barbour; Mark J. Carvlin; Michael A. Fiddy, Editor(s)

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