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Proceedings Paper

Improved optical techniques for studying sonic and supersonic injection into Mach 3 flow
Author(s): Alvin E. Buggele; Richard G. Seasholtz
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Paper Abstract

Filtered Rayleigh Scattering and shadowgraph flow visualization were used to characterize the penetration of helium or moist air injected transversely at several pressures to a Mach 3 flow in the NASA Lewis 3.81 inch by 10 inch continuous flow supersonic wind tunnel. This work is in support of the LOX augmented nuclear thermal rocket program. The present study used an injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser to illuminate a transverse section of the injectant plume. Rayleigh scattered light was passed through an iodine absorption cell to suppress stray laser light and was imaged onto a cooled CCD camera. The scattering was based on condensation of water vapor in the injectant flow. Results are presented for various configurations of sonic and supersonic injector designs mounted primarily in the floor of the tunnel. Injectors studied include a single 0.25 inch diameter hole, five 0.112 inch diameter holes on 0.177 inch spacing, and a 7 degree half angle wedge. High speed shadowgraph flow visualization images were obtained with several video camera systems. Roof and floor static pressure data are presented several ways for the three configurations of injection designs with and without helium and/or air injection into Mach 3 flow.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 November 1997
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 3172, Optical Technology in Fluid, Thermal, and Combustion Flow III, (21 November 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.293408
Show Author Affiliations
Alvin E. Buggele, NASA Lewis Research Ctr. (United States)
Richard G. Seasholtz, NASA Lewis Research Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3172:
Optical Technology in Fluid, Thermal, and Combustion Flow III
Soyoung Stephen Cha; James D. Trolinger; Masaaki Kawahashi, Editor(s)

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