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Proceedings Paper

Three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction of simulated and in-vivo subsurface chromophores
Author(s): Derek J. Smithies; Thomas E. Milner; J. Stuart Nelson; Martin J. C. van Gemert; Dennis M. Goodman
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Paper Abstract

IR tomography (IRT) is a non-contact technique to determine the size and position of sub-surface and position of sub- surface chromophores, using a recorded time sequence of IR emission images following pulsed laser irradiation. A potential application for IRT is the laser treatment of port wine stains (PWS), where the clinician needs diagnostic information to select optical irradiation parameters. In this paper, we report recent progress using IRT to determine diagnostic information regarding blood vessels comprising a PWS. In our simulations, a 3D skin model containing an epidermis and blood vessels is used, from which a time sequence of IR emission images is calculated. Size and position of sub-surface chromophores computed from the time sequence of IR emission images by application of an inversion algorithm are very close to actual values. For in vivo studies, the chick chorioallantoic membrane is an ideal PWS mode. Size and position of a sub-surface blood vessel are correctly predicted by application of an inversion algorithm, given a recorded time sequence of IR emission images.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 June 1997
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 2975, Laser-Tissue Interaction VIII, (16 June 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.275475
Show Author Affiliations
Derek J. Smithies, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (United States)
Thomas E. Milner, Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic (United States)
J. Stuart Nelson, Univ. of California/Irvine (United States)
Martin J. C. van Gemert, Academic Medical Ctr. (Netherlands)
Dennis M. Goodman, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2975:
Laser-Tissue Interaction VIII
Steven L. Jacques, Editor(s)

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