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Proceedings Paper

In-vivo confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopic characterization of retinal pathology in a small-eye-animal model
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Paper Abstract

We have used confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (CSLO) to evaluate acute laser retinal injury in a small eye animal model. THe snake eye is optically unique, combining a high numerical aperture with a clear ocular media and a cornea covered with a hard dry spectacle. These optical qualities allow detailed resolution of photoreceptors, retinal nerve fiber, and retinal capillary blood cells in an intact vertebrate eye. We demonstrated that acute laser exposures capable of damaging the photoreceptor matrix may also alter blood flow at more anterior levels of the retina. Changes in photoreceptor density and orientation were indicated in the early post exposure seconds at high dose acute Argon laser exposures. An increase in photoreceptor reflectivity was observed in surviving photoreceptors and was enhanced with a near IR CSLO imaging source. Q-switched exposure failed to show this enhancement, possibly because of greater subchoroidal involvement associated with acoustic damage processes.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 May 1997
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 2974, Laser and Noncoherent Ocular Effects: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment, (2 May 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.275253
Show Author Affiliations
Harry Zwick, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Rowe Elliot, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Steven T. Schuschereba, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
David J. Lund, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Bruce E. Stuck, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2974:
Laser and Noncoherent Ocular Effects: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment
Bruce E. Stuck; Michael Belkin, Editor(s)

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