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Proceedings Paper

Effects of methylprednisolone on laser-induced retinal injuries
Author(s): Mordechai Rosner; Marina Tchirkov; Galina Dubinski; Yoram Solberg; Michael Belkin
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Paper Abstract

Methylprednisolone have been demonstrated to ameliorate retinal photic injury. In the current study we examined its effect on laser induced retinal injury. Retinal lesions were inflicted by argon laser in 36 pigmented DA rats. The treated groups received intra-peritoneally methylprednisolone in saline, injected 3 times a day for 2 days, starting immediately after exposure. The controls received the vehicle on the same schedule. The rats were sacrificed 3, 20 or 60 days after laser exposure and the lesions were evaluated by light microscopy and morphometric measurements. Laser injuries were associated with disruption of the outer retinal layers. Three and 20 days after exposure, the loss of the photoreceptor-cell nuclei was significantly milder in the treated groups as compared with controls. There was no difference 60 days after exposure. In conclusion, methylprednisolone reduced temporarily the photoreceptor cell loss in argon laser induced retinal injury, when treatment was started immediately after laser exposure. There was no long term effect.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 May 1997
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 2974, Laser and Noncoherent Ocular Effects: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment, (2 May 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.275239
Show Author Affiliations
Mordechai Rosner, Tel Aviv Univ. Goldschleger Eye Institute (Israel)
Marina Tchirkov, Tel Aviv Univ. Goldschleger Eye Institute (Israel)
Galina Dubinski, Tel Aviv Univ. Goldschleger Eye Institute (Israel)
Yoram Solberg, Tel Aviv Univ. Goldschleger Eye Institute (Israel)
Michael Belkin, Tel Aviv Univ. Goldschleger Eye Institute (Israel)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2974:
Laser and Noncoherent Ocular Effects: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment
Bruce E. Stuck; Michael Belkin, Editor(s)

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