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Proceedings Paper

Role of the eye in high-speed motion analysis
Author(s): William G. Hyzer
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Paper Abstract

Prior to the investigation of the photographic process over 150 years ago, the analyses of rapid motions were limited by the dynamic efficacies of the human eye, which has a temporal resolution of approximately 1/10 sec and a maximum information acquisition rate estimated at 103 to 104 bits/sec. At high rates of object motion, only the simplest actions can be resolved, comprehended and retained in human memory. Advances in the field of high-speed photography drastically changed all this by providing us with the ability today to capture permanent images of transient events at acquisition rates in excess of 1012 bits/sec. As remarkable as these improvements in temporal resolution and image retention may be, the final step in correctly interpreting any image still rests largely upon the analyst's ability to process visual data. Those who enter the field of image analysis soon learn how capricious the eye can be in this task. It is incumbent upon anyone performing important image analyses to have at least a basic understanding of the eye's performance characteristics, especially its limitations and capricious anomalies. Exemplary data presented in this paper are drawn from the scientific literature and the author's forty years of experience as a researcher, author and educator in the field of high-speed imaging.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 May 1997
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 2869, 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, (28 May 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.273446
Show Author Affiliations
William G. Hyzer, Consultant (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2869:
22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics
Dennis L. Paisley; ALan M. Frank, Editor(s)

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