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Proceedings Paper

Neural network face recognition using wavelets
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Paper Abstract

The recognition of human faces is a phenomenon that has been mastered by the human visual system and that has been researched extensively in the domain of computer neural networks and image processing. This research is involved in the study of neural networks and wavelet image processing techniques in the application of human face recognition. The objective of the system is to acquire a digitized still image of a human face, carry out pre-processing on the image as required, an then, given a prior database of images of possible individuals, be able to recognize the individual in the image. The pre-processing segment of the system includes several procedures, namely image compression, denoising, and feature extraction. The image processing is carried out using Daubechies wavelets. Once the images have been passed through the wavelet-based image processor they can be efficiently analyzed by means of a neural network. A back- propagation neural network is used for the recognition segment of the system. The main constraints of the system is with regard to the characteristics of the images being processed. The system should be able to carry out effective recognition of the human faces irrespective of the individual's facial-expression, presence of extraneous objects such as head-gear or spectacles, and face/head orientation. A potential application of this face recognition system would be as a secondary verification method in an automated teller machine.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 April 1997
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 3077, Applications and Science of Artificial Neural Networks III, (4 April 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.271480
Show Author Affiliations
Passant V. Karunaratne, Lafayette College (United States)
Ismail I. Jouny, Lafayette College (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 3077:
Applications and Science of Artificial Neural Networks III
Steven K. Rogers, Editor(s)

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