Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Micropatterned surfaces for understanding and influencing interactions of biological systems with optical devices
Author(s): Gabriel P. Lopez; Leonard M. Tender; Gail Bradley; Kimberly A. Opperman; Philip D. Hampton
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

This paper reviews methods for forming micropatterned surfaces of self-assembled monolayers of alkylthiolates on gold and their use in studying and manipulating interactions of biological systems with solid surfaces. Optics-based biosensor arrays are an example of a technology where it is desirable to prepare microscopic patterns of well-defined surfaces that contain regions with specific bioactivity or that resist nonspecific biointeraction (e.g., nonspecific protein adsorption and cellular attachment). Several simple patterning techniques are described including photopatterning, monolayer displacement, microinjection, and electrochemical patterning. The relative merits of these techniques are discussed with regard to maintenance of bioactivity of immobilized chemical species, resistance to nonspecific bioactivity, and application to rapid, large- scale patterning. The use of electrochemical patterning is also described in the creation of a model microsensor array.

Paper Details

Date Published: 31 March 1997
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 2978, Micro- and Nanofabricated Electro-Optical Mechanical Systems for Biomedical and Environmental Applications, (31 March 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.269954
Show Author Affiliations
Gabriel P. Lopez, Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
Leonard M. Tender, Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
Gail Bradley, Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
Kimberly A. Opperman, Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
Philip D. Hampton, Univ. of New Mexico (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2978:
Micro- and Nanofabricated Electro-Optical Mechanical Systems for Biomedical and Environmental Applications
Paul Lee Gourley, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top