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Proceedings Paper

Wide-area traffic surveillance (WATS) system
Author(s): William C. Schwartz; Robert A. Olson
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Paper Abstract

This paper discusses a configuration of overhead active- infrared imaging vehicle sensors that can be used to monitor traffic on freeways and their entrance and exit ramps in order to provide the information needed to optimize the flow of traffic. The Wide-Area Traffic-Surveillance system, which is being developed under a program with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, comprises single-lane and three-lane sensors that employ line-scanned laser rangefinders to measure the presence, speed, and 3D profiles of vehicles passing beneath them in single-lane or three-lane fields of view, respectively. The time-tagged outputs of the various sensors are routed, via hard wire or radio link, to a central processor where site-specific software is used to generate a computer image of the real-time area-wide traffic flow, with icons representing vehicles. The software is also used to determine traffic parameters including vehicle flow rate, average speed, density, classification, and travel time as well as ramp demand, passage, and queue length. Principles of sensor operation, system architecture, hardware and software functions, and interfaces and communication protocols will be described. Test results obtained at two sites on a major arterial in Orlando, Florida, will be presented.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 February 1997
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 2902, Transportation Sensors and Controls: Collision Avoidance, Traffic Management, and ITS, (17 February 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.267138
Show Author Affiliations
William C. Schwartz, Schwartz Electro-Optics, Inc. (United States)
Robert A. Olson, Schwartz Electro-Optics, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2902:
Transportation Sensors and Controls: Collision Avoidance, Traffic Management, and ITS
Alan C. Chachich; Marten J. de Vries, Editor(s)

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