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Proceedings Paper

Canine olfactory sensitivity to cocaine hydrochloride and methyl benzoate
Author(s): L. Paul Waggoner; James M. Johnston; Marc Williams; Jan Jackson; Meredith H. Jones; Teresa Boussom; James A. Petrousky
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Paper Abstract

Methyl benzoate is a consistent product of cocaine hydrochloride exposed to humid air. The detection responses of dogs trained to detect illicit cocaine hydrochloride may be controlled by vapor from cocaine, methyl benzoate, or other constituents of illicit cocaine. The present study addressed the following questions: 1) How capable are dogs of detecting methyl benzoate compared to cocaine hydrochloride, 2) When dogs are trained to detect methyl benzoate, do they respond to cocaine hydrochloride as being the same or different from methyl benzoate. These questions were investigated using random source dogs trained and tested under laboratory conditions. Odor stimuli were generated and delivered by a vapor generation systems, the outputs from which were characterized by thermal desorption GC/MS. ONe group of dogs was trained to discriminate pharmaceutical grade and illicit cocaine hydrochloride from clean air and tested using a two lever procedure to determine their sensitivity to these substances. A second group of dogs was trained to discriminate between methyl benzoate and clean air and tested for their sensitivity to the substance. The dogs in this second group were then tested using a three lever procedure to determine their sensitivity to these substances. A second group of dogs was trained to discriminate between methyl benzoate and clean air and tested for their sensitivity to the substance. The dogs in this second group were then tested using a three lever procedure to determine whether they responded to cocaine hydrochloride as the same or different from methyl benzoate.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 February 1997
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 2937, Chemistry- and Biology-Based Technologies for Contraband Detection, (17 February 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.266775
Show Author Affiliations
L. Paul Waggoner, Auburn Univ. (United States)
James M. Johnston, Auburn Univ. (United States)
Marc Williams, Auburn Univ. (United States)
Jan Jackson, Auburn Univ. (United States)
Meredith H. Jones, Auburn Univ. (United States)
Teresa Boussom, Auburn Univ. (United States)
James A. Petrousky, U.S. Office of Special Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2937:
Chemistry- and Biology-Based Technologies for Contraband Detection
Pierre Pilon; Steve Burmeister, Editor(s)

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