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Proceedings Paper

Analysis of the volatile organic compounds in seized cocaine hydrochloride
Author(s): Lindy Espina Dejarme; Sara J. Lawhon; Prasenjit Ray; Michael R. Kuhlman
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Paper Abstract

The volatile organic compounds in seized cocaine hydrochloride were analyzed using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). Two different methods of sampling volatile compounds were investigated. In the first method, 20, 50, and 100 mg samples of seized cocaine hydrochloride were loaded into 2-inch glass tubes. The headspace of each tube was then purged with ultra high purity (UHP) helium and the gas exiting the tube was directed through a cryogenic loop filled with glass beads and maintained at liquid nitrogen temperature. The volatile organic compounds were collected onto the glass beads while the helium gas was vented. The organic compounds were subsequently thermally desorbed onto the column and analyzed by GC/MS. In the second method, 10 mg and 100 mg samples of seized cocaine hydrochloride were loaded into glass tubes fitted with glass frits at one end. UHP helium was purged through each sample and the purge gas containing organic compounds was collected onto a sorbent tube packed with Tenax TA. The concentrated organic compounds were then thermally desorbed onto a 4 m section of a split GC capillary column maintained at -70 degrees C with flow rates of 20-28 ml/min. Flow was returned to 2.8 ml/min during analysis. By sampling the seized samples of cocaine hydrochloride using a cryogenic loop, methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, acetic acid, 2,2,4-trimethyl pentane, 2-methyl pentane, dichloromethane, 2-propanol, and 2-propanol, and 2-propane (acetone) were found in three different seized cocaine hydrochloride samples. The observed quantities of these volatile organic compounds were different for each of the three seized cocaine hydrochloride samples. THe observed quantities of these volatile organic compounds were different for each of the three seized samples labeled A, B, and C. By sampling the seized samples of cocaine hydrochloride using sorbent tubes, cocaine was consistently observed. Although volatile components other than cocaine were observed, the number and amount of volatile components were not consistent with the cryogenic loop results.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 February 1997
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 2937, Chemistry- and Biology-Based Technologies for Contraband Detection, (17 February 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.266769
Show Author Affiliations
Lindy Espina Dejarme, Battelle Memorial Institute/Columbus Div. (United States)
Sara J. Lawhon, Battelle Memorial Institute/Columbus Div. (United States)
Prasenjit Ray, Battelle Memorial Institute/Columbus Div. (United States)
Michael R. Kuhlman, Battelle Memorial Institute/Columbus Div. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2937:
Chemistry- and Biology-Based Technologies for Contraband Detection
Pierre Pilon; Steve Burmeister, Editor(s)

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