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Proceedings Paper

Multispectral signature analysis measurements of selected sniper rifles and small arms
Author(s): David B. Law; Edward M. Carapezza; Christina J. Csanadi; Gerald D. Edwards; Todd M. Hintz; Ronald M. Tong
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Paper Abstract

During October 1995 - June 1996, the Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Center RDT&E Division (NRaD), under sponsorship from Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), conducted an intensive series of multi-spectral signature analyses of typical sniper weapons. Multi-spectral signatures of the muzzle flashes from rifles and pistols and some imagery of the bullets in flight were collected. Multi- spectral signatures of the muzzle flash were collected in the infrared (2.5 - 14.5 microns), visible -- near-IR (400 - 1200 nanometers), and the ultra-violet (185 - 400 nanometers) wavelength regions. These measurements consisted of high spectral resolution (0.0159 micron) measurements of the spectral radiance of the muzzle flash. A time history plot of the muzzle flash as it evolves just forward of the end of the muzzle is provided. These measurements were performed with a CI Systems Model SR5000 IR/Visible spectroradiometer and an Ocean Optics Model PC1000 UV spectroradiometer. Muzzle flash infrared imagery is provided to show the effect that specific muzzle breaks have on the resulting muzzle flash. The following set of sniper weapons were included in this test: AK-47, SKS, M16A2, M-14, FN-FAL, SMLE IIa, 03 Springfield, SVD Dragunov, 50 caliber McMillan, and a 45 caliber ACP pistol. The results of this signature analysis show that important measurable electro-optical differences do exist between all these weapons in terms of spectral radiance of the flash, spectral content of the gun powders, and spectral shapes/geometries of the muzzle flashes. These differences were sufficient such that, after a more complete data base is collected, it will be possible to develop a passive electro-optical weapon and ammunition identifier.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 February 1997
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 2938, Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence Systems for Law Enforcement, (18 February 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.266751
Show Author Affiliations
David B. Law, Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Ctr. (United States)
Edward M. Carapezza, DARPA (United States)
Christina J. Csanadi, Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Ctr. (United States)
Gerald D. Edwards, Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Ctr. (United States)
Todd M. Hintz, Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Ctr. (United States)
Ronald M. Tong, Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2938:
Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence Systems for Law Enforcement
Edward M. Carapezza; Donald Spector, Editor(s)

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