Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Coastal optical water type 2: modeling and minerogenic scattering
Author(s): Robert Hans Stavn; Alan D. Weidemann
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

We are carrying out parameterizations of Type 1 oceanic waters to Type 2 coastal waters and determining the effects of minerogenic matter on attempts to retrieve the backscattering coefficient from radiance and irradiance data. This new parameterization involves the incorporation of suspended minerogenic matter into our ocean optical models. The deeply 'lobed' backscattering portion of the volume scattering function for suspended minerogenic matter in coastal Type 2 waters has a profound effect on the upwelling radiance signal and therefore on algorithms that utilize upwelling radiances. Clay-like minerogenic matter can create a 200 percent overestimate of the backscattering coefficient for Air Mass 1 conditions and a 50 percent underestimate of the backscattering coefficient under Air Mass 2 conditions in the surface layers of coastal waters. Quartz-like minerogenic matter, range of diameters 60-360 micrometers for size distributions typical of California and Florida, stirred up with and added to suspended clay-like particles, will radically alter further the backscattering shape factor and the error of inversion of the backscattering coefficient. In this case a nearly 30 percent error of underestimate results in the surface layers that then increases with depth to more than a 15 percent overestimate coefficient under Air Mass 1 conditions. There is then a 20 percent overestimate at all depths under Air Mass 2 conditions.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 February 1997
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 2963, Ocean Optics XIII, (6 February 1997); doi: 10.1117/12.266476
Show Author Affiliations
Robert Hans Stavn, University of North Carolina/Greensboro (United States)
Alan D. Weidemann, Naval Research Laboratory (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2963:
Ocean Optics XIII
Steven G. Ackleson; Robert J. Frouin, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top