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Proceedings Paper

New instrument for atmospheric chemistry mission: MASTER+
Author(s): Paolo Spera; D. Oricchio; Ugo Cortesi
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Paper Abstract

The knowledge of the state of the atmosphere is limited and atmospheric spectroscopy from space is for many disciplines an indispensable tool for understanding the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. In order to support the studies in the millimetric and sub-millimetric spectral range, the ESA has established a scientific group which has examined this problem and has come up with the conclusion that two missions can be defined. A stratospheric mission, fulfilled by an instrument comprising sub-millimetric channels and the MASTER mission. MASTER is a limb sounder which performs passive monitoring of the atmosphere at MM channel bands providing high performance radiometric/spectrometric measurements for determination of atmospheric profiles for H2O, CO, O3, HNO3, SO2, and N2O. Recently, the scientific group has established that a strong priority should be put on exchange mechanisms between the troposphere and the stratosphere for a future atmospheric chemistry mission. For this reason, an enhanced version of MASTER has been proposed. This enhanced version of MASTER should be able to include the ClO measurement capability with an additional band. This work has been conducted under funding from the Earth Observation Preparatory Programme of the European Space Agency. Purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the engineering activities performed in order to preliminary assess the MASTER instrument feasibility.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 December 1996
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 2958, Microwave Sensing and Synthetic Aperture Radar, (17 December 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.262712
Show Author Affiliations
Paolo Spera, Alenia Spazio SpA (Italy)
D. Oricchio, Alenia Spazio SpA (Italy)
Ugo Cortesi, Applied Meteorology Foundation (Italy)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2958:
Microwave Sensing and Synthetic Aperture Radar
Giorgio Franceschetti; Christopher John Oliver; Franco S. Rubertone; Shahram Tajbakhsh, Editor(s)

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