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Proceedings Paper

Development and application of the lux gene for environmental bioremediation
Author(s): Robert S. Burlage; Zamin Yang; Robert J. Palmer; Gary S. Sayler; Yongho Khang
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Paper Abstract

Bioremediation is the use of living systems, usually microorganisms, to treat a quantity of soil or water for the presence of hazardous wastes. Bioremediation has many advantages over other remediation approaches, including cost savings, versatility, and the ability to treat the wastes in situ. In order to study the processes of microbial bioremediation, we have constructed bacterial strains that incorporate genetically engineered bioreporter genes. These bioreporter genes allow the bacteria to be detected during in situ processes, as manifested by their ability to bioluminesce or to fluoresce. This bioreporter microorganisms are described, along with the technology for detecting them and the projects which are benefiting from their application.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 November 1996
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 2835, Advanced Technologies for Environmental Monitoring and Remediation, (26 November 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.259755
Show Author Affiliations
Robert S. Burlage, Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States)
Zamin Yang, Oak Ridge National Lab. (United States)
Robert J. Palmer, Univ. of Tennessee Ctr. for Environmental Biotechnology (United States)
Gary S. Sayler, Univ. of Tennessee Ctr. for Environmental Biotechnology (United States)
Yongho Khang, Yeungnam Univ. (South Korea)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2835:
Advanced Technologies for Environmental Monitoring and Remediation
Tuan Vo-Dinh, Editor(s)

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