Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Domain management OSSs: bridging the gap between legacy and standards-based network management systems
Author(s): Todd A. Lemley
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

The rapid change in the telecommunications environment is forcing carriers to re-assess not only their service offering, but also their network management philosophy. The competitive carrier environment has taken away the luxury of throwing technology at a problem by using legacy and proprietary systems and architectures. A more flexible management environment is necessary to effectively gain, and maintain operating margins in the new market era. Competitive forces are driving change which gives carriers more choices than those that are available in legacy and standards-based solutions alone. However, creating an operational support system (OSS) with this gap between legacy and standards has become as dynamic as the services which it supports. A philosophy which helps to integrate the legacy and standards systems is domain management. Domain management relates to a specific service or market 'domain,'and its associated operational support requirements. It supports a companies definition of its business model, which drives the definition of each domain. It also attempts to maximize current investment while injecting new technology available in a practical approach. The following paragraphs offer an overview of legacy systems, standards-based philosophy, and the potential of domain management to help bridge the gap between the two types of systems.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 November 1996
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 2917, Broadband Access Systems, (4 November 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.257352
Show Author Affiliations
Todd A. Lemley, Objective Systems Integrators (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2917:
Broadband Access Systems
Wai Sum Lai; Sam T. Jewell; Curtis A. Siller; Indra Widjaja; Dennis Karvelas; Indra Widjaja; Dennis Karvelas, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top