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Proceedings Paper

Investigation of superthin carbon layers and multilayer carbon structures by x-ray reflectivity measurements
Author(s): Alexander M. Baranov; Sergei A. Tereshin; Igor Fedorovich Mikhailov; V. I. Pinegin
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Paper Abstract

In situ x-ray monitoring of reflectivity in the short range 0.05 - 0.3 nm for investigation of thin carbon layers and multilayer carbon structures is proposed. X-ray monitoring is based on periodical alternations of Fresnel's reflectivity when layer thickness increases or decreases. The source of x rays with wavelength 0.154 nm was located out of working volume of installation and consisted of x-ray tube, monochromator block and collimating system. The objects of in-situ investigations were carbon films obtained by rf-plasma discharge and magnetron methods. Multilayer carbon structures were synthesized by alternating these layers. Density and microroughness of the growing film were determined for every half-wave of reflectivity oscillations that corresponds to averaging by the layer of 1.0 nm thickness. It is shown that x-ray monitoring system permits the user to control the layers thickness during multilayer structure growth with precision up to 0.1 nm.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 November 1996
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 2863, Current Developments in Optical Design and Engineering VI, (1 November 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.256242
Show Author Affiliations
Alexander M. Baranov, Research Institute of Vacuum Technique (Russia)
Sergei A. Tereshin, Science-Research Institute of Vacuum Technique (Russia)
Igor Fedorovich Mikhailov, Kharkov State Polytechnic Univ. (Ukraine)
V. I. Pinegin, Kharkov State Polytechnic Univ. (Ukraine)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2863:
Current Developments in Optical Design and Engineering VI
Robert E. Fischer; Warren J. Smith, Editor(s)

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