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Proceedings Paper

Using aerial acquired images to improve cotton and peanut production systems
Author(s): Craig Kvien; Deborah Waters; Stuart Pocknee; Lynn Usery; Natasha Wells
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Paper Abstract

Modern agriculture management is an extraordinarily complex task. The most complex tasks are management for environmental benefits. Chemical, physical and biological characteristics are known to vary over short distances in a field. However, most fields are treated as uniform, leading to over application and environmental pollution, or under application and suboptimal yields. Affordable navigation and positioning systems linked to sensing technologies and integrated into a geographic information system (GIS) are revolutionizing the way agriculture can address environmental variabilities. One challenge to better management of within field variability is the establishment of management zones for various inputs. Our research and development group is currently using aerial acquired images to help establish management zones for nutrients, pest scouting, and to monitor crop growth and development. These images are ground truthed and coupled with additional information layers such as maps of yield, disease, insect and weed pests, soil properties, topography to help establish relationships between the various components affecting crop growth and to help improve management decisions during the growing season.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 November 1996
PDF: 3 pages
Proc. SPIE 2818, Multispectral Imaging for Terrestrial Applications, (4 November 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.256086
Show Author Affiliations
Craig Kvien, Univ. of Georgia (United States)
Deborah Waters, Univ. of Georgia (United States)
Stuart Pocknee, Univ. of Georgia (United States)
Lynn Usery, Univ. of Georgia (United States)
Natasha Wells, Univ. of Georgia (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2818:
Multispectral Imaging for Terrestrial Applications
Brian Huberty; Joan B. Lurie; Jule A. Caylor; Pol Coppin; Pierre C. Robert, Editor(s)

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