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Proceedings Paper

Expanding capabilities of the debris analysis workstation
Author(s): David B. Spencer; Marlon E. Sorge; Deanna L. Mains; Ann J. Shubert; Charlotte M. Gerhart; Ken W. Yates; Michael Leake
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Paper Abstract

Determining the hazards from debris-generating events is a design and safety consideration for a number of space systems, both currently operating and planned. To meet these and other requirements, the United States Air Force (USAF) Phillips Laboratory (PL) Space Debris Research Program has developed a simulation software package called the Debris Analysis Workstation (DAW). This software provides an analysis capability for assessing a wide variety of debris hazards. DAW integrates several component debris analysis models and data visualization tools into a single analysis platform that meets the needs for Department of Defense space debris analysis, and is both user friendly and modular. This allows for studies to be performed expeditiously by analysts who are not debris experts. The current version of DAW includes models for spacecraft breakup, debris orbital lifetime, collision hazard risk assessment, and collision dispersion, as well as a satellite catalog database manager, a drag inclusive propagator, a graphical user interface, and data visualization routines. Together they provide capabilities to conduct several types of analyses, ranging from range safety assessments to satellite constellation risk assessment. Work is progressing to add new capabilities with the incorporation of additional models and improved designs. The existing tools are in their initial integrated form, but the 'glue' that will ultimately bring them together into an integrated system is an object oriented language layer scheduled to be added soon. Other candidate component models under consideration for incorporation include additional orbital propagators, error estimation routines, other dispersion models, and other breakup models. At present, DAW resides on a SUNR workstation, although future versions could be tailored for other platforms, depending on the need.

Paper Details

Date Published: 31 October 1996
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2813, Characteristics and Consequences of Orbital Debris and Natural Space Impactors, (31 October 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.256053
Show Author Affiliations
David B. Spencer, Air Force Phillips Lab. (United States)
Marlon E. Sorge, The Aerospace Corp. (United States)
Deanna L. Mains, The Aerospace Corp. (United States)
Ann J. Shubert, The Aerospace Corp. (United States)
Charlotte M. Gerhart, Nichols Research (United States)
Ken W. Yates, ORION International Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Michael Leake, ORION International Technologies, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2813:
Characteristics and Consequences of Orbital Debris and Natural Space Impactors
Timothy D. Maclay; Firooz A. Allahdadi, Editor(s)

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