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Proceedings Paper

Modeling the diffraction efficiencies of the AXAF high-energy transmission gratings: II
Author(s): Kathryn A. Flanagan; T. T. Fang; C. Baluta; John E. Davis; Daniel Dewey; Thomas H. Markert; Dale E. Graessle; Jeremy J. Drake; Jonathan J. Fitch; Jiahong Zhang Juda; Jonathan W. Woo; Stefan Kraft; Peter Bulicke; R. Fliegauf; Frank Scholze; Gerhard Ulm; James M. Bauer
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Paper Abstract

In order to characterize the instrumentation on AXAF, each of the science instrument teams carries out sub-assembly calibrations. For the high energy transmission grating (HETG) group, this means individual measurements of the diffraction efficiencies of each of the 336 grating elements that goes into the completed HETG assembly. Measurements are made at a number of energies (corresponding to x-ray emission lines) which fix the parameters of a model. This model is determined from first principles and verified by extensively testing sample grating elements at synchrotron radiation facilities. Here we present new synchrotron radiation (SR) data obtained at the national Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and at the radiometry laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) using the electron storage ring BESSY in Berlin. The gratings are from AXAF flight lots, and we apply an improved data reduction technique which builds on our experience from last year (Markert et al., SPIE Proceedings 2518, 424, 1995). Our analysis takes into account the effects of small extended wings in the diffraction of the various orders in the NSLS data. Our goal is to obtain efficiencies in the 0th and plus/minus 1st diffraction orders which are accurate in the 1% level, except near absorption edges, where accuracies in the 5% to 10% level are required. With a few exceptions (discussed here) our new data/improved model meets these goals.

Paper Details

Date Published: 31 October 1996
PDF: 27 pages
Proc. SPIE 2808, EUV, X-Ray, and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for Astronomy VII, (31 October 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.256038
Show Author Affiliations
Kathryn A. Flanagan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
T. T. Fang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
C. Baluta, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
John E. Davis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Daniel Dewey, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Thomas H. Markert, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Dale E. Graessle, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States)
Jeremy J. Drake, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Jonathan J. Fitch, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Jiahong Zhang Juda, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Jonathan W. Woo, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics (United States)
Stefan Kraft, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany)
Peter Bulicke, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany)
R. Fliegauf, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany)
Frank Scholze, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany)
Gerhard Ulm, Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany)
James M. Bauer, Univ. of Hawaii (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2808:
EUV, X-Ray, and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for Astronomy VII
Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Mark A. Gummin, Editor(s)

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