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Proceedings Paper

Temperature modulation of near-infrared distributed feedback diode lasers for gas sensing
Author(s): Jacobus S. Vermaak; Gregory H. Olsen; E. R. Argueta; E. Mykietyn; Ramon U. Martinelli; Raymond J. Menna; John C. Connolly
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Paper Abstract

It is well known that DFB lasers tune by a factor of at least 10 times more with temperature than with current. The problem, however, is that the electrical modulation of the laser is easier and much faster than temperature modulation. This paper describes a novel technique to temperature modulate a DFB laser. A 1393 nm DFB laser chip is mounted directly on a single element thermo-electric cooler (TEC) which allows temperature modulation of the chip by passing a current in both the forward and reverse direction through the TEC. A +/- 40 mA modulation through the TEC at a rate of up to 30 Hz provides a frequency sweep of 46 GHz of the laser output frequency. The time constant of the setup is 10 ms.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 October 1996
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 2834, Application of Tunable Diode and Other Infrared Sources for Atmospheric Studies and Industrial Process Monitoring, (21 October 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.255319
Show Author Affiliations
Jacobus S. Vermaak, Sensors Unlimited, Inc. (United States)
Gregory H. Olsen, Sensors Unlimited, Inc. (United States)
E. R. Argueta, Sensors Unlimited, Inc. (United States)
E. Mykietyn, Sensors Unlimited, Inc. (United States)
Ramon U. Martinelli, David Sarnoff Research Ctr. (United States)
Raymond J. Menna, David Sarnoff Research Ctr. (United States)
John C. Connolly, David Sarnoff Research Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2834:
Application of Tunable Diode and Other Infrared Sources for Atmospheric Studies and Industrial Process Monitoring
Alan Fried, Editor(s)

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