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Proceedings Paper

Sounder bias correction of the east-west radiance gradient
Author(s): Timothy J. Schmit
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Paper Abstract

As reported by Weinreb et. al., both the imager and sounder exhibit an east-west radiance gradient due to reflection off the coating of the scan mirrors. While this problem was basically eliminated with ground processing in the imagers as of the spring and summer of 1995, the sounder instruments were corrected on March 26, 1996 and June 19, 1996 for the GOES-9 and GOES-8, respectively. This paper will investigate the process of minimizing the sounder east-west radiance variation by a radiance bias adjustment prior to the use of radiances in product generation. The sounder ground- corrected data show that the radiance bias adjustment does not change as much as a function of longitude, and that the biases between those observed from the sounder and those calculated from the 'truth' profiles are reduced. The artificial east-west gradient across the earth is difficult to observe due to several affects, including clouds, land/sea differences, topography and natural variations. Reducing/eliminating the artificial east-west gradient helps the retrieving of atmospheric parameters, like moisture. The second part of this paper presents the verification of satellite derived moisture profiles. Even before the ground correction of the east-west gradient, atmospheric moisture retrievals have been shown to improve upon the 'first guess' profile.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 October 1996
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 2812, GOES-8 and Beyond, (18 October 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.254108
Show Author Affiliations
Timothy J. Schmit, National Satellite Data and Information Service/NOAA (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2812:
GOES-8 and Beyond
Edward R. Washwell, Editor(s)

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