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A comparison of ground-based and airborne SAR systems for the detection of landmines, UXO, and IEDs
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Paper Abstract

The task of detecting and locating landmines, unexploded ordnances (UXO) and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is still a major challenge up to the present day. Problems such as the distance between the hazardous area and the measurement system as well as the differentiation between the target of interest and the surrounding soil are of importance in the development of the sensor system. Various types of radar based systems have been developed over the last decades to solve these problems. Compared to other methods ground penetrating synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has the ability to scan large areas from a safe standoff distance in a relatively short time. In this paper, two different imaging radar systems are compared. The first one is a ground-based SAR (GB-SAR) developed at German Aerospace Center (DLR). The other system is an unmanned aerial vehicle-based SAR (UAV-SAR) from the University of Ulm. The presented data originates from a joint campaign using the same measurement scenarios.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 May 2019
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 11003, Radar Sensor Technology XXIII, 1100304 (3 May 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2518587
Show Author Affiliations
Andreas Heinzel, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (Germany)
Markus Schartel, Univ. Ulm (Germany)
Ralf Burr, Hochschule Ulm (Germany)
Rik Bähnemann, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)
Eric Schreiber, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (Germany)
Markus Peichl, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (Germany)
Christian Waldschmidt, Univ. Ulm (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 11003:
Radar Sensor Technology XXIII
Kenneth I. Ranney; Armin Doerry, Editor(s)

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