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Proceedings Paper

Transient photoconductivity and light-activated p-n junction device based on bilayer-substituted polythiophene derivatives
Author(s): Yaron Greenwald; Jorge M. Poplawski; Eitan A. Ehrenfreund; Shammai Speiser
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Paper Abstract

We have studied acceptor substituted poly(3-butyl)thiophene in an attempt to examine the role of acceptor molecules as intrinsic charge traps under light excitations by measuring the transient photoconductivity response following pulse excitation. The specially synthesized acceptor molecule is a chemically prepared high electron affinity (HEA) monomer, 1- (4-nitrophenyl)-2-(3-thienyl) ethene. In the co-polymers prepared with this acceptor monomer we have observed a simultaneous decrease of the sub-nanosecond photoconductivity and increase of the slow component is attributed to a bimolecular recombination process. A new photoinduced current rectifier based on an all-organic donor-acceptor bilayer substituted polythiophene derivative is described. Under visible and UV illumination, a p-n junction is formed leading to current rectification. Maximum photo-rectified current is obtained at approximately 400 nm, with a sharp decrease at shorter wavelengths. This sharp decrease indicates that photons with energy higher than 3.1 eV quench the light activation of this bilayer device.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 September 1996
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2851, Photopolymer Device Physics, Chemistry, and Applications III, (30 September 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.251818
Show Author Affiliations
Yaron Greenwald, Technion--Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)
Jorge M. Poplawski, Technion--Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)
Eitan A. Ehrenfreund, Technion--Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)
Shammai Speiser, Technion--Israel Institute of Technology (Israel)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2851:
Photopolymer Device Physics, Chemistry, and Applications III
Roger A. Lessard, Editor(s)

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