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Ultra-short, high-dose rate digital x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitters for advanced cone-beam breast computed tomography
Author(s): Jun-Tae Kang; Jin-Woo Jeong; Sora Park; Jae-Woo Kim; Ki Nam Yun; Eunsol Go D.V.M.; Jeong-Woong Lee; Hyojin Jeon; Yujung Ahn; Ji-Hwan Yeon; Sunghee Kim; Yoon-Ho Song
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Paper Abstract

Cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBCT) would be a promising modality in screening and diagnosis of breast, providing complete 3-dimensional images with little painful compression of breast during the imaging compared to conventional mammography and tomosynthesis. To date, all CBCT systems including a commercial one by Koning have been utilizing a typical filament-based x-ray tube. However, the filament-based x-ray tube even in a grid type has strict limitation in time resolution, of longer than few milliseconds, with a limited dose rate to cause a large motion blur in CBCT projection images. Micro-calcifications of less than 1 mm in early breast cancer could be hardly distinguished by using conventional CBCT systems. We tried to solve this problem by adopting a fast digital x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters. We, for the first time, developed a rotational anode x-ray tube with CNT emitters for advanced CBCTs. The x-ray tube consisted of CNT paste-emitters and a rotating anode made of W/Re target, and was fully vacuum-sealed with a glass envelope. Ultra-short x-ray pulses of less than sub-ms with a moderate high current of more than 200 mA and a focal spot of ~0.3 in nominal value was successfully obtained. We performed preliminary studies on CBCT imaging using the digital x-ray tube and achieved 300 projection images for 10 s, great reducing motion blurs in the images. It is expected that the CNT digital x-ray tube developed improves CBCT imaging greatly and then promotes CBCT modality in breast screening and diagnosis.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 March 2019
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 10948, Medical Imaging 2019: Physics of Medical Imaging, 109481I (1 March 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2512685
Show Author Affiliations
Jun-Tae Kang, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Jin-Woo Jeong, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Sora Park, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Jae-Woo Kim, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Ki Nam Yun, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Eunsol Go D.V.M., Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Jeong-Woong Lee, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Hyojin Jeon, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Yujung Ahn, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)
Ji-Hwan Yeon, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Sunghee Kim, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Yoon-Ho Song, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)
Univ. of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10948:
Medical Imaging 2019: Physics of Medical Imaging
Taly Gilat Schmidt; Guang-Hong Chen; Hilde Bosmans, Editor(s)

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