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Montage based 3D medical image retrieval from traumatic brain injury cohort using deep convolutional neural network
Author(s): Cailey I. Kerley; Yuankai Huo; Shikha Chaganti; Shunxing Bao; Mayur B. Patel; Bennett A. Landman
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Paper Abstract

Brain imaging analysis on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is essential for the diagnosis, risk prediction of progression, and treatment of the structural phenotypes of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, in real clinical imaging scenarios, entire body CT images (e.g., neck, abdomen, chest, pelvis) are typically captured along with whole brain CT scans. For instance, in a typical sample of clinical TBI imaging cohort, only ~15% of CT scans actually contain whole brain CT images suitable for volumetric brain analyses; the remaining are partial brain or non-brain images. Therefore, a manual image retrieval process is typically required to isolate the whole brain CT scans from the entire cohort. However, the manual image retrieval is time and resource consuming and even more difficult for the larger cohorts. To alleviate the manual efforts, in this paper we propose an automated 3D medical image retrieval pipeline, called deep montage-based image retrieval (dMIR), which performs classification on 2D montage images via a deep convolutional neural network. The novelty of the proposed method for image processing is to characterize the medical image retrieval task based on the montage images. In a cohort of 2000 clinically acquired TBI scans, 794 scans were used as training data, 206 scans were used as validation data, and the remaining 1000 scans were used as testing data. The proposed achieved accuracy=1.0, recall=1.0, precision=1.0, f1=1.0 for validation data, while achieved accuracy=0.988, recall=0.962, precision=0.962, f1=0.962 for testing data. Thus, the proposed dMIR is able to perform accurate CT whole brain image retrieval from largescale clinical cohorts.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 March 2019
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 10949, Medical Imaging 2019: Image Processing, 109492U (15 March 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2512559
Show Author Affiliations
Cailey I. Kerley, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Yuankai Huo, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Shikha Chaganti, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Shunxing Bao, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Mayur B. Patel, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Tennessee Valley Healthcare System (United States)
Veterans Affairs Medical Ctr. (United States)
Bennett A. Landman, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10949:
Medical Imaging 2019: Image Processing
Elsa D. Angelini; Bennett A. Landman, Editor(s)

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