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Transnasal introduction catheter, a new platform for imaging and biopsying the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Hamid Farrokhi; Jing Dong; David O. Otuya; Yogesh Verma; Sarah K. Zemlok; Aditya Kumar; Rachel E. Shore; Sarah L. L. Giddings; Nitasha G. M. Bhat; Omair Shakil; Catriona N. Grant; Norman Nishioka; Mireille Rosenberg; Christopher Damman; Guillermo J. Tearney
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Paper Abstract

Upper endoscopy is a standard technique for imaging, sampling, and treating gastrointestinal tissue. Endoscopy is frequently requiring the subjects who undergo the procedure be consciously sedated. Sedation necessitates that the endoscopy procedure be conducted in a specialized setting to mitigate complications should they arise. Endoscopy is further problematic for infants and young children (aged 0-24 months) who sometimes need to be anesthetized. These issues motivate alternative methods for upper gastrointestinal tract visualization and biopsy that do not require conscious sedation/anesthesia. To address this need, we have developed a double lumen 6.5 Fr transnasal introduction catheter (TNIC). During transnasal insertion, real-time OCT imaging provides confirmation of the anatomical location of the device. Once in the stomach, a safe and high-density liquid metal fills a balloon at the distal tip of the TNIC, allowing it to passively transit through stomach into the small intestine. Once properly positioned, OCT-guided instruments for imaging and biopsy can be inserted through main lumen of the TNIC, performing many of the functions of conventional endoscopy and advanced endomicroscopy. To test the feasibility of the TNIC, we conducted a clinical study using the first version of the device in 4 unsedated normal volunteers. Results showed detailed OCT endomicroscopy images of the esophagi and duodena. These results suggest that TNIC may be an effective, less invasive method for the diagnosis of upper GI tract conditions.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 March 2019
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Proc. SPIE 10854, Endoscopic Microscopy XIV, 108540L (4 March 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2510381
Show Author Affiliations
Hamid Farrokhi, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Jing Dong, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
David O. Otuya, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Yogesh Verma, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Sarah K. Zemlok, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Aditya Kumar, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Rachel E. Shore, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Sarah L. L. Giddings, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Nitasha G. M. Bhat, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Omair Shakil, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Catriona N. Grant, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Norman Nishioka, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Mireille Rosenberg, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Christopher Damman, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (United States)
Guillermo J. Tearney, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10854:
Endoscopic Microscopy XIV
Guillermo J. Tearney; Thomas D. Wang; Melissa J. Suter, Editor(s)

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