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A framework for analyzing resolution in optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Matt Hepburn; Philip Wijesinghe; Lixin Chin; Brendan F. Kennedy
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Paper Abstract

In OCE, the link between measured displacement and elasticity is non-trivial in complex tissues and a number of simplifying assumptions regarding deformation are made to generate an elastogram. In compression OCE, for instance, elasticity is assumed to be inversely proportional to axial strain (the gradient of axial displacement with depth). However, this assumption relies on the tissue being mechanically uniform. This assumption is typically invalid and limits elastogram resolution. Despite this, few studies have explored OCE resolution in detail. Previously, OCE resolution has been reported laterally as the OCT resolution, and axially as the spatial range of displacement used to estimate axial strain. However, this describes only the ability to resolve axial strain. The ability to resolve features is also dependent on the interplay of mechanical deformation and the model with which it is analyzed. We present a framework for analyzing resolution in OCE, which combines a model of mechanical deformation, using finite-element analysis, with a model of the OCT system and signal processing, based on linear systems theory. We present simulated and experimental elastograms of tissue-mimicking phantoms, showing close correspondence, and demonstrate, for instance, that the resolution of a square 1-mm inclusion can vary, within one image, from 100 μm to 200 μm axially, and from 100 μm to 380 μm laterally. We demonstrate that axial and lateral resolution are directly related to inclusion size and mechanical contrast. Our framework may enable OCE systems to be tailored to specific applications and can be extended to other forms of OCE.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 March 2019
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Proc. SPIE 10880, Optical Elastography and Tissue Biomechanics VI, 108800O (4 March 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2509030
Show Author Affiliations
Matt Hepburn, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research (Australia)
The Univ. of Western Australia (Australia)
Philip Wijesinghe, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research (Australia)
The Univ. of Western Australia (Australia)
Lixin Chin, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research (Australia)
The Univ. of Western Australia (Australia)
Brendan F. Kennedy, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research (Australia)
The Univ. of Western Australia (Australia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10880:
Optical Elastography and Tissue Biomechanics VI
Kirill V. Larin; Giuliano Scarcelli, Editor(s)

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