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Proceedings Paper

Rapid integrated circuit delayering without grass
Author(s): William E. Vanderlinde; Christopher J. Von Benken; Addison R. Crockett
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Paper Abstract

Reactive ion etching (RIE) provides a rapid method for delayering integrated circuits. A problem that can prevent successful delayering is the 'grass' that sometimes occurs during plasma etching of silicon dioxide on integrated circuits by CF4 or CF4 plus O2 plasmas. RIE grass is due to micro-etch-masking of the silicon dioxide surface by foreign materials. The consequence is poor delayering results. In this paper we demonstrate that RIE grass has three basic causes, each of which results in a different physical appearance. The first type of grass is due to sputter re-deposition of package materials such as gold. This can only be eliminated by masking the gold from exposure to the plasma. The second type of RIE grass is due to attack of exposed aluminum chip metallization which results in micro-etch-masking by aluminum or aluminum compounds. This can be avoided by eliminating O2 from the gas supply whenever aluminum lines are exposed. The third type of grass is due to plasma etch chemistry which results in polymer formation on the sample surface. This can be eliminated by reducing the gas pressure which increases plasma potential and therefore increases sputtering.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 September 1996
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2874, Microelectronic Manufacturing Yield, Reliability, and Failure Analysis II, (12 September 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.250834
Show Author Affiliations
William E. Vanderlinde, Microelectronics Research Lab. (United States)
Christopher J. Von Benken, Microelectronics Research Lab. (United States)
Addison R. Crockett, Trion Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2874:
Microelectronic Manufacturing Yield, Reliability, and Failure Analysis II
Ali Keshavarzi; Sharad Prasad; Hans-Dieter Hartmann, Editor(s)

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