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Intracellular delivery of nanoparticles via microelectrophoresis technique (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Mengke Han; Sanam Mustafa; Yinlan Ruan; Steven Wiederman; Jiangbo Zhao; Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem; Joseph Fabian
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Paper Abstract

Nanoparticles with various properties and functions are of growing interest for biomedical research, such as in vivo and in vitro sensors, imaging agents and delivery vehicles of therapeutics. An effective method to deliver nanoparticles into the intracellular environment is still a major challenge and critical to many biological studies. Current techniques, such as intracellular uptake, electroporation and microinjection, have different benefits and limitations (e.g., aggregation and endosomal degradation of nanoparticles, high cell mortality and low throughput). We demonstrate application of the well-established microelectrophoresis technique for the first time to deliver nanoparticles into target cells using fine-tipped micropipettes, which overcomes some of these delivery difficulties. Semiconductive quantum dots were selected as the nanoparticles in this study as they are widely used for biomedical imaging and sensing due to having functionalized surfaces suitable for bioconjugation, adaptable photophysical properties for multiplexed detection, and superior stability for longer investigation times. We developed a method to prepare monodisperse suspensions of quantum dots with average hydrodynamic diameter of ~20nm, which demonstrated sufficient colloidal stability to prevent aggregation and blockages in the tip of micropipettes during ejection while enabling sufficient electrical conductivity for ejection and recording electrical activity of cells. Fine-tipped glass micropipettes with an average tip inner diameter of 206 nm for ejection but less than 500 nm to minimize the cell membrane damage and cell distortion were successfully fabricated. Finally, quantum dots were successfully delivered into living human embryonic kidney cells using small electrical currents through fine-tipped glass micropipettes. The delivered quantum dots were found to stay monodispersed within the cells for 2 hours. We believe that microelectrophoresis technique may serve as a simple and general strategy for delivering a variety of biocompatible nanoparticles intracellularly in various biological systems.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 March 2019
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Proc. SPIE 10893, Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications XI, 108930C (4 March 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2507707
Show Author Affiliations
Mengke Han, The Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)
ARC Ctr. of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (Australia)
Sanam Mustafa, The Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)
ARC Ctr. of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (Australia)
Yinlan Ruan, The Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)
ARC Ctr. of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (Australia)
Steven Wiederman, The Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)
ARC Ctr. of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (Australia)
Jiangbo Zhao, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
The Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)
Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, The Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)
Joseph Fabian, The Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10893:
Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications XI
Samuel Achilefu; Ramesh Raghavachari, Editor(s)

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