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Imaging and lesion ablation modeling in skin using freezing to enhance penetration depth of terahertz radiation
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Paper Abstract

The terahertz (THz) band lies between the infrared and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The 0.1-2.0 THz band is unique in that the radiation is both highly absorbed by liquid water and has a relatively low coefficient of absorption in ice; less than 0.0001% of the radiation survives to a depth of 1.0 millimetre in liquid water, whereas 90% of the signal survives in ice at 0.45 THz. The liquid water absorption has limited the potential for deployment of THz radiation for imaging and therapeutics in human tissues to the level of the epidermis. By first freezing the skin in situ, THz penetration to a depth of 5.0 millimetres becomes viable. Computational modelling using tissue phantoms was used to explore the concept of in situ skin freezing. The modelling indicates that the border between frozen skin and underlying non-frozen tissue provides a reflective boundary, which is the main site for signal return to the surface. The non-frozen layer just under the frozen skin is also the site for most of the THz radiation absorption. The results show that the freezing method may be useful in estimating the depth of frozen skin tissue in cryotherapy, imaging skin lesions and as method of accurate, targeted thermal ablation of lesions within the dermis by delivering high energy THz pulses through a frozen “window”.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 February 2019
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 10851, Photonics in Dermatology and Plastic Surgery 2019, 108510E (26 February 2019); doi: 10.1117/12.2506659
Show Author Affiliations
Zoltan Vilagosh, Swinburne Univ. of Technology (Australia)
Australian Ctr. for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (Australia)
Alireza Lajevardipour, Swinburne Univ. of Technology (Australia)
Australian Ctr. for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (Australia)
Andrew W. Wood, Swinburne Univ. of Technology (Australia)
Australian Ctr. for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (Australia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10851:
Photonics in Dermatology and Plastic Surgery 2019
Bernard Choi; Haishan Zeng, Editor(s)

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