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Proceedings Paper

Femtosecond laser-induced modifications of frequency tripling mirrors
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Paper Abstract

We have studied laser induced material modification in a frequency tripling mirror (FTM) consisting of alternating hafnia and silica layers. The third-harmonic signal generated by a train of femtosecond laser pulses (791 nm, 55 fs, 110 MHz) drops over time until it reaches about 20% of the initial value. From the observed changes in reflection and transmission of the mirror a refractive index change of 0.07 was estimated, which occurs in the layer with the highest field enhancement. This index change triggers a drop in the field enhancement, which reduces the efficiency of nonlinear optical processes. The estimated value of ▵n allowed us to explain the 80% reduction in conversion efficiency and as well as an observed decrease in two-photon absorption.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 November 2018
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 10805, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials 2018: 50th Anniversary Conference, 108051W (16 November 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2500675
Show Author Affiliations
Amir Khabbazi Oskouei, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
Sebastian Baur, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
Luke Emmert, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States)
Marco Jupe, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (Germany)
Thomas Willemsen, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (Germany)
Morten Steinecke, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (Germany)
Lars Jensen, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (Germany)
Detlev Ristau, Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (Germany)
Wolfgang Rudolph, The Univ. of New Mexico (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10805:
Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials 2018: 50th Anniversary Conference
Christopher Wren Carr; Gregory J. Exarhos; Vitaly E. Gruzdev; Detlev Ristau; M.J. Soileau, Editor(s)

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