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Proceedings Paper

Silicon carbide layers produced by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition
Author(s): F. H. Ruddell; D. McNeill; Brian Mervyn Armstrong; Harold S. Gamble
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Paper Abstract

A rapid thermal CYD reactor has been employed for the deposition of silicon carbide layers on silicon. Stoichiometric SiC layers were deposited using silane/propane gas chemistry over the temperature range 720-970C. The process wafer was ramped rapidly to the deposition temperature after gas flows were established. The deposition was thus temperature activated so that minimum thermal budgets were obtained. The influence of both process pressure and the silane/propane gas flow ratio on carbon and oxygen content in the films was determined. The critical conditions for the deposition of stoichiometric silicon carbide with minimum oxygen content and without an interfacial oxide layer have been determined. In-situ doping with phosphine has been employed to deposit SiC layers with a phosphorus concentration of 5x1020cm3 and a resistivity of O. 6ohm. cm. Heterojunction silicon bipolar transistors were fabricated with deposited SiC layers for the emitters. While some enhancement was obtained for transistors with oxygen contaminated emitters those with purer emitters had common emitter gains of less than unity. This has been attributed to a reduction in base lifetime due to a carbonisation tail.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 March 1991
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 1361, Physical Concepts of Materials for Novel Optoelectronic Device Applications I: Materials Growth and Characterization, (1 March 1991); doi: 10.1117/12.24394
Show Author Affiliations
F. H. Ruddell, Queen's Univ. of Belfast (United Kingdom)
D. McNeill, Queen's Univ. of Belfast (United Kingdom)
Brian Mervyn Armstrong, Queen's Univ. of Belfast (United Kingdom)
Harold S. Gamble, Queen's Univ. of Belfast (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1361:
Physical Concepts of Materials for Novel Optoelectronic Device Applications I: Materials Growth and Characterization

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