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Proceedings Paper

Microtelemetry techniques for implantable smart sensors
Author(s): Philip R. Troyk; M. A.K. Schwan; G. A. DeMichele; Gerald E. Loeb; Joe Schulman; P. Strojnik
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Paper Abstract

The advent of the emerging field of smart sensors suggests new applications for implantable microelectronic devices in neural prostheses. Optimal use of miniature and subminiature (thin- film) electronic sensors in implanted systems will depend upon the nature of the power and communication link to the sensor. Microtelemetry technology is under current development to meet this need. Microtelemetry techniques can be used to provide operating power and bi- directional communication for a microimplant through a common, wireless, magnetic link. Owing to the extremely unfavorable geometry, i.e. the size of the implant relative to the size of the extracorporeal transmitter, the design of such links is highly parametric. Magnetic circuit parameters must be closely matched to the implant's integrated-circuit power usage. In addition, the bandwidth of the communication channel must be adequate to meet the data collection requirements. This paper describes on-going R&D work for the design and fabrication of smart sensors based upon microtelemetry technology. Presently, sensor designs for two applications are in progress -- EMG and joint angle position.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 May 1996
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 2718, Smart Structures and Materials 1996: Smart Sensing, Processing, and Instrumentation, (30 May 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.240887
Show Author Affiliations
Philip R. Troyk, Illinois Institute of Technology (United States)
M. A.K. Schwan, Illinois Institute of Technology (United States)
G. A. DeMichele, Illinois Institute of Technology (United States)
Gerald E. Loeb, Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Scientific Research (United States)
Joe Schulman, Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Scientific Research (United States)
P. Strojnik, Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Scientific Research (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2718:
Smart Structures and Materials 1996: Smart Sensing, Processing, and Instrumentation
Kent A. Murphy; Dryver R. Huston, Editor(s)

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