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Proceedings Paper

Ultrafast streak camera evaluations of phase noise from an actively stabilized colliding-pulse-mode-locked ring dye laser
Author(s): David R. Walker; William E. Sleat; J. M. Evans; Wilson Sibbett
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Paper Abstract

Modelocked laser systems are now capable of generating picosecond and femtosecond optical pulses either directly or by employing optical pulse compression techniques. It has recently become important in certain experiments that the repetition rate of the probe laser be precisely synchronised with a radio-frequency drive signal, or with other modelocked laser systems. Examples of relevant applications include those requiring sampling procedures (eg. electro-optic sampling) and also those where synchronously-operating streak cameras are used. In the latter, long-term pulse-timing jitter gives rise to an overall loss of camera resolution. Although the dispersion-compensated Colliding- Pulse-Modelocked (CPM) ring dye laser is routinely capable of directly generating optical pulses of less then 50 fs [1] it has become clear that such passively modelocked systems can suffer from severe medium and long term phase noise. Investigations of this phase-noise by measurements made in the frequency and time domains will be described here.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 April 1991
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 1358, 19th Intl Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, (1 April 1991); doi: 10.1117/12.24013
Show Author Affiliations
David R. Walker, Univ. of St. Andrews (United Kingdom)
William E. Sleat, Univ. of St. Andrews (United Kingdom)
J. M. Evans, Univ. of St. Andrews (United Kingdom)
Wilson Sibbett, Univ. of St. Andrews (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1358:
19th Intl Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics
Peter W. W. Fuller, Editor(s)

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