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Proceedings Paper

Heart-rate telemetry as a means of investigating duration of disturbance and bioenergetics in free-living ungulates
Author(s): Denis Chabot; V. Geist; R. H. Johnston; R. H. MacArthur
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Paper Abstract

Heart rate (HR) telemetry was used in studies of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis) to determine HR associated with normal daily activities and detect changes in HR signalling arousal. HR was measured in wapiti (Cervus elaphus) to clarify the effects of normal activities, arousal and imposed work on FIR and metabolic rate (MR). The instrumentation used was analogue. The electrocardiogram (ECG), obtained from two electrodes on the sternum of the subject, was used to frequency modulate the 148.8 MHz carrier. The signal was transmitted with a power of about one milliwatt and was received by a very sensitive single side band receiver up to distances of about 6 km. The output signal could be checked aurally for adequate quality and was stored on cassette tape for later processing. The original ECG was recovered and either displayed on a strip chart recorder or analyzed with a computer acquisition system. HR was found to be a better indicator of arousal due to external stimuli than was the behavior of the animal. In free-ranging bighorn sheep many factors external to the animal (natural or experimentally-induced) elicited HR responses. In captive wapiti HR was found to be a good predictor of energy utilization in both calm and aroused animals.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 June 1990
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 1355, Telecommunication for Health Care: Telemetry, Teleradiology, and Telemedicine, (1 June 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.23869
Show Author Affiliations
Denis Chabot, Univ. of Calgary (Canada)
V. Geist, Univ. of Calgary (Canada)
R. H. Johnston, Univ. of Calgary (Canada)
R. H. MacArthur, Univ. of Manitoba (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1355:
Telecommunication for Health Care: Telemetry, Teleradiology, and Telemedicine

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