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Proceedings Paper

Autofluorescence detection of oxidized LDL in monocytes: a novel risk factor for the assessment of atherosclerosis?
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Paper Abstract

Oxidative modification of the major cholesterol carrying lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), renders it more atherogenic as well as inducing unique fluorescence spectral characteristics that distinguish it from native (non-oxidized) LDL. This fluorescence feature has been identified using a microspectrofluorometry system capable of recording autofluorescence of individual cultured macrophages incubated with oxidized LDL. Differences in fluorescence spectra between individual control cells and oxidized LDL loaded cells could also be elicited using dye-enhanced fluorescence with neutral lipid probes such as nile red. Autofluorescence spectroscopy applied to the detection of intracellular oxidized LDL accumulation in circulating monocytes may be useful for identifying a novel risk factor in the assessment of atherosclerosis.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 April 1996
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 2679, Advances in Laser and Light Spectroscopy to Diagnose Cancer and Other Diseases III: Optical Biopsy, (5 April 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.237595
Show Author Affiliations
Tami N. Fink, Rice Univ. (United States)
Alexander A. Oraevsky, Rice Univ. (United States)
Frank K. Tittel, Rice Univ. (United States)
Sharon L. Thomsen, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)
Steven L. Jacques, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2679:
Advances in Laser and Light Spectroscopy to Diagnose Cancer and Other Diseases III: Optical Biopsy
Robert R. Alfano; Abraham Katzir, Editor(s)

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