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Proceedings Paper

Ocular hazards of tunable continuous-wave near-infrared laser sources
Author(s): David J. Lund; Peter R. Edsall; Douglas F. Fuller; Stephen W. Hoxie
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Paper Abstract

Retinal damage thresholds (ED50s) were determined in Rhesus monkey eyes for 100 ms exposures to collimated radiation from a tunable Ti:Sapphire laser at several wavelengths from 700 nm to 900 nm. Prior research using 15 ns duration laser pulses showed a strong variability of ED50 with wavelength for retinal exposure in Rhesus monkeys to laser radiation in the near infrared spectrum. Current studies with the Ti:Sapphire laser show similar variability of ED50 with wavelength for 100 ms retinal exposures. Previously measured light transmission and absorption properties of ocular tissues do not provide a complete or obvious explanation for the significant variations of threshold with small changes in wavelength. Similar wavelength dependencies of ED50 for the two exposure durations in the wavelength range of 750 nm to 830 nm suggest that linear absorption is a cause of the variability. However, differences in the ED50 curves at other wavelengths show that nonlinear mechanisms also contribute.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 April 1996
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 2674, Laser-Inflicted Eye Injuries: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment, (1 April 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.237518
Show Author Affiliations
David J. Lund, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Peter R. Edsall, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Douglas F. Fuller, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Stephen W. Hoxie, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2674:
Laser-Inflicted Eye Injuries: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment
Bruce E. Stuck; Michael Belkin, Editor(s)

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