Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Comparing laser-induced retinal damage from ir wavelengths to that from visible wavelengths
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

An earlier report documented exposure parameters for inducing corneal, lens, and retinal damage with a laser emitting in the `eye-safe' wavelength range (Nd:YAG laser radiation at 1.318 micrometers and 1.356 micrometers ). Ocular damage thresholds are much higher for these wavelengths than for visible wavelength lasers. However, it was also noted that an exposure in the `eye-safe' wavelength range may result in multiple damage sites throughout the ocular medium and retina/choroid; that seemingly unaffected exposure sites, when monitored over time, may reveal slowly developing (days or longer) tissue degeneration; and, that the tissue degradation may ultimately involve regions greater in area than those directly irradiated by the laser. In order to elucidate the nature of tissue degeneration following IR laser exposure, the comparative pathology of retinal tissues exposed to argon and IR laser radiation is reported. Further, periodic post-exposure exams were conducted using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy to monitor the in vivo progress of the ocular tissue response following IR exposures. These observations are also contrasted to the results of corresponding examinations following visible wavelength laser exposures.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 April 1996
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 2674, Laser-Inflicted Eye Injuries: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment, (1 April 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.237511
Show Author Affiliations
Joseph A. Zuclich, TASC, Inc. (United States)
Steven T. Schuschereba, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
Harry Zwick, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)
F. Cheney, Air Force Armstrong Lab. (United States)
Bruce E. Stuck, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2674:
Laser-Inflicted Eye Injuries: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment
Bruce E. Stuck; Michael Belkin, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top