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Proceedings Paper

Pharmacological treatment of laser eye injuries by neuroprotection
Author(s): Yoram Solberg M.D.; Mordechai Rosner M.D.; Michael Belkin M.D.
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Paper Abstract

Many retinal injuries result in an irreversible neuronal loss, which can not yet be reduced by pharmacological methods. To determine whether glutamate-receptor blockers can serve as neuroprotective agents in the retina, as they do in the central nervous system, we examined the effects of MK-801, an NMDA-receptor antagonist, on laser-induced retinal injury in a rat model. Immediately and 8 h after argon laser retinal photocoagulation, rats were treated with intraperitoneal injections of MK-801 (3 mg/kg) or saline. After 3, 20 or 60 days the animals were sacrificed and their retinal lesions were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Photoreceptor cell loss, both immediately and up to 2 months after laser irradiation, was significantly smaller in MK-801-treated rats than controls. MK-801 exhibits neuroprotective property in the retina. This points to the involvement of glutamate in the laser-induced retinal neuronal damage. Glutamate-receptor blockers should be further investigated for therapy of retinal diseases characterized by neuronal cell destruction.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 April 1996
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 2674, Laser-Inflicted Eye Injuries: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment, (1 April 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.237507
Show Author Affiliations
Yoram Solberg M.D., Tel Aviv Univ. Goldschleger Eye Research Institute (Israel)
Mordechai Rosner M.D., Tel Aviv Univ. Goldschleger Eye Research Institute (Israel)
Michael Belkin M.D., Tel Aviv Univ. Goldschleger Eye Research Institute (Israel)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2674:
Laser-Inflicted Eye Injuries: Epidemiology, Prevention, and Treatment
Bruce E. Stuck; Michael Belkin M.D., Editor(s)

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