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Proceedings Paper

Simulation and visualization of 3D flow fields in the human cerebral ventricular system
Author(s): Peter Cahoon; Douglas Cochrane; Ellen Grant
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Paper Abstract

The flow dynamics of the ventricular system in the brain are poorly understood. Invasive monitoring using radioisotope tracers or contrast media allows sampling of only one spatial location over time. Using non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) makes it difficult to obtain a coherent 3D dataset having adequate spatial and temporal resolution. In order to increase our understanding of cerebrospinal fluid flow, and brain motion in vivo, a 3D geometric model was constructed by segmentation of coronal cross sections of the ventricular space. The initial model was constructed with some modifications in the geometry in order to simplify the flow field. The third ventricle became an unlimited reservoir of constant pressure. The simulation deals with pulsatile flow across a free surface boundary. The ependyma ventricular lining can be considered as an elastic membrane that deforms the ventricular space at a rate linked to the cardiac cycle. Consequently, one is dealing with a transient dynamic analysis whose displacements and velocities can be approximated by morphological changes during time-gated MRI sequences taken in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes.

Paper Details

Date Published: 8 March 1996
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 2656, Visual Data Exploration and Analysis III, (8 March 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.234675
Show Author Affiliations
Peter Cahoon, Univ. of British Columbia (Canada)
Douglas Cochrane, B.C. Children's Hospital (Canada)
Ellen Grant, Univ. of California/San Francisco (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2656:
Visual Data Exploration and Analysis III
Georges G. Grinstein; Robert F. Erbacher, Editor(s)

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