Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper • new

Raindrops of synaptic noise on dual excitability landscape: an approach to astrocyte network modelling
Author(s): Andrey Yu. Verisokin; Dmitry E. Postnov; Darya V. Verveyko; Alexey R. Brazhe
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

The most abundant non-neuronal cells in the brain, astrocytes, populate all parts of the central nervous system (CNS). Astrocytic calcium activity ranging from subcellular sparkles to intercellular waves is believed to be the key to a plethora of regulatory pathways in the central nervous system from synaptic plasticity to blood flow regulation. Modeling of the calcium wave initiation and transmission and their spatiotemporal dynamics is therefore an important step stone in understanding the crucial cogs of cognition. Astrocytes are active sensors of ongoing neuronal and synaptic activity, and neurotransmitters diffusing from the synaptic cleft make a strong impact on the astrocytic activity. Here we propose a model describing the patterns of calcium wave formation at a single cell level and discuss the interplay between astrocyte shape the calcium waves dynamics driven by local stochastic surges of glutamate simulating synaptic activity.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 April 2018
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 10717, Saratov Fall Meeting 2017: Laser Physics and Photonics XVIII; and Computational Biophysics and Analysis of Biomedical Data IV, 107171S (26 April 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2315146
Show Author Affiliations
Andrey Yu. Verisokin, Kursk State Univ. (Russian Federation)
Dmitry E. Postnov, Saratov State National Research Univ. (Russian Federation)
Darya V. Verveyko, Kursk State Univ. (Russian Federation)
Alexey R. Brazhe, Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10717:
Saratov Fall Meeting 2017: Laser Physics and Photonics XVIII; and Computational Biophysics and Analysis of Biomedical Data IV
Vladimir L. Derbov; Dmitry Engelevich Postnov, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top