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Proceedings Paper

eROSITA mated with SRG
Author(s): Peter Predehl; Walter Bornemann; Heinrich Bräuninger; Hermann Brunner; Vadim Burwitz; Diogo Coutinho; Konrad Dennerl; Josef Eder; Peter Friedrich; Maria Fürmetz; Gisela Hartner; Andreas von Kienlin; Walter Kink; Norbert Meidinger; Benjamin Mican; Siegfried Müller; Kirpal Nandra; Elmar Pfeffermann; Christian Rohé; Valeri Yaroshenko
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Paper Abstract

eROSITA (extended ROentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) is the main instrument onboard the Russian/German "Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma" (SRG) mission which will be operated in an L2 orbit. It will perform the first imaging all-sky survey in the medium energy band. The main scientific goals are a) to detect the hot intergalactic medium of ~100 thousand galaxy clusters and groups and hot gas in filaments between clusters to map out the large scale structure in the Universe for the study of cosmic structure evolution, b) to detect systematically all obscured accreting Black Holes in nearby galaxies and many (up to 3 Million) new, distant active galactic nuclei, and c) to study in detail the physics of galactic X-ray source populations, like pre-main sequence stars, supernova remnants and X-ray binaries. The eROSITA flight model was assembled in 2016 and has successfully passed all acceptance tests on instrument level in the facilities of MPE and IABG in Germany. eROSITA was shipped to NPOL (SRG prime contractor) in January 2017. Currently (May 2018) eROSITA has been integrated on the SRG spacecraft and has successfully passed all functional tests. eROSITA is now awaiting its launch from the Baikonur cosmodrome in spring 2019. The launcher will be a PROTON with an upper stage BLOK-DM.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 July 2018
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 10699, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2018: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray, 106995H (6 July 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2315139
Show Author Affiliations
Peter Predehl, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Walter Bornemann, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Heinrich Bräuninger, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Hermann Brunner, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Vadim Burwitz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Diogo Coutinho, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Konrad Dennerl, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Josef Eder, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Peter Friedrich, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Maria Fürmetz, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Gisela Hartner, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Andreas von Kienlin, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Walter Kink, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Norbert Meidinger, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Benjamin Mican, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Siegfried Müller, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Kirpal Nandra, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Elmar Pfeffermann, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Christian Rohé, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)
Valeri Yaroshenko, Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10699:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2018: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray
Jan-Willem A. den Herder; Shouleh Nikzad; Kazuhiro Nakazawa, Editor(s)

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