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Photochromic focal plane mask for MOS spectroscopy
Author(s): Luca Oggioni; Andrea Bianco; Marco Landoni; Lina Tomasella; Ulisse Munari; Giorgio Pariani; Chiara Bertarelli
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Paper Abstract

The development of smart devices based on new materials is a possible strategy for renew small telescopes which nowadays are loosing appeal. In this scenario, we propose a FPM (Focal Plane Mask) based on photochromic materials for MOS spectroscopy. Photochromic MOS masks consist of polymer thin films which can be reversibly made opaque or transparent in a restricted wavelength range using alternatively UV and visible light. Slit patterns can thus be easily written by means of a red laser directly at the telescope place, making possible to optimize their dimensions to the observing conditions and also any kind of shape can be obtained, included curved geometry, without mechanical limitations. To test the technique we designed and produced two different photochromic masks, which were successfully used at the national Copernico telescope in Asiago (Italy).

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 July 2018
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 10706, Advances in Optical and Mechanical Technologies for Telescopes and Instrumentation III, 1070636 (10 July 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2313143
Show Author Affiliations
Luca Oggioni, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)
INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Andrea Bianco, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Marco Landoni, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Lina Tomasella, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Ulisse Munari, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova (Italy)
Giorgio Pariani, INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy)
Chiara Bertarelli, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10706:
Advances in Optical and Mechanical Technologies for Telescopes and Instrumentation III
Ramón Navarro; Roland Geyl, Editor(s)

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