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Progress in the construction and testing of the Tianlai radio interferometers
Author(s): Santanu Das; Christopher J. Anderson; Reza Ansari; Jean-Eric Campagne; Daniel Charlet; Xuelei Chen; Zhiping Chen; Aleksander J. Cianciara; Pierre Colom; Yanping Cong; Kevin G. Gayley; Jingchao Geng; Jie Hao; Qizhi Huang; Celeste S. Keith; Chao Li; Jixia Li; Yichao Li; Chao Liu; Tao Liu; Christophe Magneville; John P. Marriner; Jean-Michel Martin; Marc Moniez; Trevor M. Oxholm; Ue-li Pen; Olivier Perdereau; Jeffrey B. Peterson; Huli Shi; Lin Shu; Albert Stebbins; Shijie Sun; Peter T. Timbie; Steve Torchinsky; Gregory S. Tucker; Guisong Wang; Rongli Wang; Xin Wang; Yougang Wang; Fengquan Wu; Yidong Xu; Kaifeng Yu; Jiao Zhang; Juyong Zhang; Le Zhang; Jialu Zhu; Shifan Zuo
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Paper Abstract

The Tianlai Pathfinder is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of using wide field of view radio interferometers to map the density of neutral hydrogen in the Universe after the Epoch of Reionizaton. This approach, called 21 cm intensity-mapping, promises an inexpensive means for surveying the large-scale structure of the cosmos. The Tianlai Pathfinnder presently consists of an array of three, 15 m × 40 m cylinder telescopes and an array of sixteen, 6 m diameter dish antennas located in a radio-quiet part of western China. The two types of arrays were chosen to determine the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The primary goal of the Pathfinder is to make 3D maps by surveying neutral hydrogen over large areas of the sky in two different redshift ranges: first at 1.03 > z > 0.78 (700 - 800 MHz) and later at 0.21 > z > 0.12 (1170-1270 MHz). The most significant challenge to 21 cm intensity-mapping is the removal of strong foreground radiation that dwarfs the cosmological signal. It requires exquisite knowledge of the instrumental response, i.e. calibration. In this paper we provide an overview of the status of the Pathfinder and discuss the details of some of the analysis that we have carried out to measure the beam function of both arrays. We compare electromagnetic simulations of the arrays to measurements, discuss measurements of the gain and phase stability of the instrument, and provide a brief overview of the data processing pipeline.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 July 2018
PDF: 18 pages
Proc. SPIE 10708, Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy IX, 1070836 (9 July 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2313031
Show Author Affiliations
Santanu Das, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
Fermi National Accelator Lab. (United States)
Christopher J. Anderson, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
Reza Ansari, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France)
Jean-Eric Campagne, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France)
Daniel Charlet, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France)
Xuelei Chen, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Zhiping Chen, Hangzhou Dianzi Univ. (China)
Aleksander J. Cianciara, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
Pierre Colom, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, GEPI, Univ. PSL (France)
Yanping Cong, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
Kevin G. Gayley, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
Jingchao Geng, The 54th Research Institute of China Electronics Technology Group Corp. (China)
Jie Hao, Institute of Automation (China)
Qizhi Huang, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
Celeste S. Keith, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
Chao Li, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Jixia Li, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
Yichao Li, Univ. of KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa)
Chao Liu, The 54th Research Institute of China Electronics Technology Group Corp. (China)
Tao Liu, Hangzhou Dianzi Univ. (China)
Christophe Magneville, DSM, Irfu, DPhP, CEA-Saclay (France)
John P. Marriner, Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (United States)
Jean-Michel Martin, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, GEPI, Univ. PSL (France)
Marc Moniez, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France)
Trevor M. Oxholm, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
Ue-li Pen, Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (Canada)
Olivier Perdereau, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, CNRS, IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Saclay (France)
Jeffrey B. Peterson, Carnegie Mellon Univ. (United States)
Huli Shi, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Lin Shu, lnstitute of Automation (China)
Albert Stebbins, Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (United States)
Shijie Sun, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
Peter T. Timbie, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)
Steve Torchinsky, CNRS, IN2P3, Observatoire de Paris, Lab. Astroparticule and Cosmology, Univ. Paris-Diderot (France)
Gregory S. Tucker, Brown Univ. (United States)
Guisong Wang, The 54th Research Institute of China Electronics Technology Group Corp. (China)
Rongli Wang, Hangzhou Dianzi Univ. (China)
Xin Wang, Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (Canada)
Yougang Wang, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Fengquan Wu, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Yidong Xu, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Kaifeng Yu, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)
Jiao Zhang, Shanxi Univ. (China)
Juyong Zhang, Hangzhou Dianzi Univ. (China)
Le Zhang, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)
Jialu Zhu, Hangzhou Dianzi Univ. (China)
Shifan Zuo, National Astronomical Observatories (China)
Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10708:
Millimeter, Submillimeter, and Far-Infrared Detectors and Instrumentation for Astronomy IX
Jonas Zmuidzinas; Jian-Rong Gao, Editor(s)

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