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ELT HARMONI: image slicer preliminary design
Author(s): Florence Laurent; Didier Boudon; Johan Kosmalski; Magali Loupias; Guillaume Raffault; Alban Remillieux; Niranjan Thatte; Ian Bryson; Hermine Schnetler; Fraser Clarke; Matthias Tecza
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Paper Abstract

Harmoni is the ELT's first light visible and near-infrared integral field spectrograph. It will provide four different spatial scales, ranging from coarse spaxels of 60 × 30 mas best suited for seeing limited observations, to 4 mas spaxels that Nyquist sample the diffraction limited point spread function of the ELT at near-infrared wavelengths. Each spaxel scale may be combined with eleven spectral settings, that provide a range of spectral resolving powers from R 3500 to R 20000 and instantaneous wavelength coverage spanning the 0.47 - 2.45 μm wavelength range of the instrument. The consortium consists of several institutes in Europe under leadership of Oxford University. Harmoni is starting its Final Design Phase after a Preliminary Design Phase in November, 2017. The CRAL has the responsibility of the Integral Field Unit design linking the Preoptics to the 4 Spectrographs. It is composed of a field splitter associated with a relay system and an image slicer that create from a rectangular Field of View a very long (540mm) output slit for each spectrograph. In this paper, the preliminary design and performances of Harmoni Image Slicer will be presented including image quality, pupil distortion and slit geometry. It has been designed by CRAL for Harmoni PDR in November, 2017. Special emphases will be put on straylight analysis and slice diffraction. The optimisation of the manufacturing and slit geometry will also be reported.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 July 2018
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 10702, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy VII, 1070296 (12 July 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2312497
Show Author Affiliations
Florence Laurent, Univ. de Lyon, Observatoire de Lyon, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS (France)
Didier Boudon, Univ. de Lyon, Observatoire de Lyon, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS (France)
Johan Kosmalski, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
Magali Loupias, Univ. de Lyon, Observatoire de Lyon, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS (France)
Guillaume Raffault, Univ. de Lyon, Observatoire de Lyon, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS (France)
Alban Remillieux, Univ. de Lyon, Observatoire de Lyon, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS (France)
Niranjan Thatte, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Ian Bryson, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr. (United Kingdom)
Hermine Schnetler, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr. (United Kingdom)
Fraser Clarke, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Matthias Tecza, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10702:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy VII
Christopher J. Evans; Luc Simard; Hideki Takami, Editor(s)

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